francis bacon, bartosz beda, paintings 2016

2016

Bartosz Beda

Expose Art Magazine: Encountering Bartosz Beda: It’s personal

Expose Art Magazine - December 2015Expose Art Magazine - December 2015 Expose Art Magazine - December 2015 Expose Art Magazine - December 2015 Expose Art Magazine - December 2015 Expose Art Magazine - December 2015 Expose Art Magazine - December 2015 Expose Art Magazine - December 2015 Expose Art Magazine - December 2015

 

Encountering Bartosz Beda: It’s personal 

Georgia Tiffany wrote an article about my paintings for December Issue of Expose Art Magazine. The article includes my recent paintings and pictures from my studio.
For more information about digital copy or hard copy of the Magazine, please go to Expose Art Magazine Website.

 

(…) Provocative.  Disturbing.  Intriguing. Every painting in the room.  But none of his work compelled me more that morning than the collection in the folio of ink drawings which he placed on the floor and turned page after page.  Lines and diaphanous smears, color running or strangely contained to blur or define each portrait, all eight faces revealing only one “functional” eye, the other either totally hidden by the hands or blackened as if gouged or disfigured or framed by the subject’s thumb and forefinger as if to focus the lens before taking a photograph.  Of whom? The viewer?  To see or not to see seems to be a thematic thread, every one of the portraits evoking its own narrative. (…)

GEORGIA TIFFANY, POET AND WRITER

 

Art by Bartosz Beda, Manchester School of Art

Graduate Scoops National Art Prize for ‘Gandhi’ Painting

15 October 2012Art by Bartosz Beda, Manchester School of Art

national art prize: Artist impresses judges with unusual Gandhi portrait
Art by Bartosz Beda, Gandhi

Gandhi – study from memory

 

MANCHESTER School of Art graduate Bartosz Beda is celebrating after winning the northern section of the national art prize at National Open Art Competition.

Bartosz, who graduated with a Masters in Fine Art this summer, beat off competition from hundreds of entries to win the £1,000 prize with a portrait of the Indian leader Ghandi painted from memory.

He said that winning the prize was both “exhausting and exciting”.

“The painting is not really a direct representation of Gandhi; I was more interested in the idea of a portrait from memory and finding the concepts behind the painting,” he said. “So colour is the most important thing.”

Inspired by industry

Bartosz, who was also shortlisted for the Saatchi New Sensations prize is currently spending six months studying at the Academy of Arts in Dresden, after receiving a scholarship. But he says it was his time spent at the Manchester School of Art which allowed his creative talents to blossom.

“When I came to Manchester I began to love the city because of the industrial feeling of the landscape and the people, who are very focussed on industry, but at the same time the city has an artistic life – it is a very different experience to Dresden,” he said.

Now 28, Bartosz says he was just seven years old when he told his mum he wanted to be an artist when he grew up. Six years ago he started to concentrate on painting, and particularly the ways in which this traditional medium can be made relevant.

“I would be silly to say there is no tradition – the tradition is every painter,” he says. “The problem is what we can do with it to make it more contemporary and fresh for the viewer.

15 October 2012

 

(detail) catalogue

frontcover inside2

(detail) accompanies the show of the same name curated by Andrew Bracey at Transition Gallery (and at H Project Space, Bangkok and The Usher Gallery, Lincoln). Produced by Transition Editions this 172 page publication includes images from all 118 artists and essays by Andrew Bracey, Simón Granell, Brian Curtin, James Elkins and David Ryan.

Available from Transition Gallery – £10

For more information please visit Transition Gallery

Silent Interior II, bartosz beda paintings 2015

2015

blast of absolute, bartosz beda paintings 2014

2014 – selected

Bartosz Beda paintings 2015

2013 – selected

bartosz beda paintings 2013

Angel of Death II, bartosz beda paintings 2012

About: Hypostasis and Angel of Death

                        Click here to view all paintings.

 

Hypostasis and Angel of Death by Bartosz Beda

Hypostasis is the idea of opposed values in the evaluated society and the concept used by intellectual and religious culture. The word ‘Hypostasis’ has a metaphorical sense, which supports a fundamental reality of solid values and undefined ideologies.

Bartosz Beda, Hypostasis I, contemporary painting

Hypostasis I, oil on canvas, 30x24cm, 2012

The Hypostasis represents one from three persons of the Holy Trinity. As a factual recognition, I have chosen the representation of Jesus, as it can be recognized in any society. Despite the factual changes in the society, where our civilization is based on religious factors, this model and complexity of culture as a common value, can be considered as unity of something much bigger then the society we live in. I am not saying that Christianity is the best solution for our spiritual existence, but I am suggesting that it could be just a transition between spirituality and religion.

Christianity has changed the understanding of Hypostasis and closed the values only to the aspects of Holy Trinity. The illumination of Jesus portraits reflects unstable philosophy of contemporary spirituality in the social climate. This influence can be used to explore those ideas in the Angel of Death. As we know from history, this nickname was given to Dr. Mengele during the Second World War, because he was determining the life or death of many people in the Auschwitz camp. The events from history, created a representation of the Angel of Death in the person of Dr. Mengele. He was a personification of everything that we can call evil.

The relationship between the personification of the Angel of Death and Hypostasis is as strong as the failure of both concepts in practice. It means that there is a strong need for change in order to create a better existence. This change could occur in individual opinions through the application of experimental rules and values in a society. Changes appear through a compilation of events, which are visible in Hypostasis and in the personification of death.

The integration of what we accept as precious values, like for instance, democracy, is a result of changes in a society and is transformed from one variation to another. This term is supported by those physical principles and those are defined intellectually.

Both the Hypostasis and the Angel of Death have numerous interpretations and expressions, which vary by culture. This personification of death, as well as a definition of a Hypostasis, exists in every culture.